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From chiska

Another variation of the endless book memes:


Grab the nearest book.
* Open the book to page 56.
* Find the fifth sentence.
* Post the text of the next sentence* in your journal along with these instructions.
* Don't dig for your favorite book, the cool book, or the intellectual one: pick the CLOSEST.

"He recalls an incident where marine construction and mysterious death coincided: It was about 1966, I believe, and I got a call from this doctor in Savannah."

From "Blue Roots" by Roger Pinckney

Comments

( 17 comments — Leave a comment )
labrys6
Oct. 1st, 2008 12:24 am (UTC)
I can't ever really play these. There are no books here in the office except a shelf-full of dictionaries of various sorts. And a couple almanacs.

::::sulk/sigh:::::::::
chiska
Oct. 1st, 2008 12:47 am (UTC)
I may have cheated - it wasn't really a "book" per se, but it was an 80+ page data sheet for a micro controller.

I really need a life.
pjvj
Oct. 1st, 2008 02:32 am (UTC)
Oh, boo. Go into the next room and grab the nearest book. :P~
chiska
Oct. 1st, 2008 04:38 am (UTC)
Yay, but the nearest book beyond that one is still some freakin' tech manual. AARRRGHHH....

Will school ever end?? I can't even find any of my good books. The ones with plots and characters and NO test at the end.
pjvj
Oct. 1st, 2008 11:42 am (UTC)
lololol. You need to keep your non-texts books closer!
labrys6
Oct. 1st, 2008 03:22 pm (UTC)
LOL....oh, well, ok, if you don't mean the literal NEAREST book.

"Yet, while such attempts give insight into altered consciousnes in Western naive subjects, they do not indicate what a "shaman" may do with experiences so derived or how she or he interacts with spirits."

There, that from the one I left lying on the table.
pjvj
Oct. 1st, 2008 04:21 pm (UTC)
Which book is that?
labrys6
Oct. 1st, 2008 05:23 pm (UTC)
Ooops, sorry. It is from "Nine Worlds of Seid-Magic: Ecstasy & Neo-Shamanism in North Europeon Paganism" by ethnographer Jenny Blain.

My latest study project, trying to find my way in the dark. Many of the techniques she writes of mirror some of my own experience in part. That particular quote happens to be from the section about practicianers who use mind-altering substances.
pjvj
Oct. 1st, 2008 05:28 pm (UTC)
Fascinating! Shaman is not my path, but it is interesting. :-)
xterminal
Oct. 1st, 2008 03:55 pm (UTC)
I never do this meme, because right now, the book closest to me is Peter Sotos' Tick, and no one really wants to read page 56. Or any other page, probably. It's even more offensive than his usual banter.
pjvj
Oct. 1st, 2008 04:22 pm (UTC)
lololol. In your case since you review books, you should pick the closest one you read for pleasure.
xterminal
Oct. 1st, 2008 04:47 pm (UTC)
Sweetie, I do read Sotos for pleasure. There are very few authors whose books I consistently pre-order, especially in limited edition. And especially for the prices the books command (the most expensive to date, Selfish, Little: The Annotated Lesley Anne Downey, ran me $70-- but given what some of his books go for on ebay these days, that's a bargain).

Since this one only asks for one sentence (I usually see it asking for the next seven), and since this one also makes a great six-word story:

"The father handed her the condom."

Wherever your mind takes you, the actual next six sentences are probably far worse.
pjvj
Oct. 1st, 2008 04:57 pm (UTC)
Oh. LMAO. I read your comment very wrong indeed.

If the next 6 sentences are worse than where *my* mind went - well EW, just EEWW!!
xterminal
Oct. 1st, 2008 05:03 pm (UTC)
Yeah. "The" takes away necessary context (which is a hallmark of Sotos' writing-- he's very detached about just about everything he writes), leaving it ambiguous as to whether it's "father" in a religious sense, "her" father, someone else's father, etc. (Though Sotos didn't really get into the "someone else's father" examination until much more recently-- there's quite a bit about it in Lordotics, the book that came out last month.)

For the record, though, it's "her". And if you went where I think you went, you were off track, but not by much. It's not incest-- her father is her pimp.

(Have I mentioned that despite publishers and critics consistently referring to Sotos' work as novels, it's all nonfiction? At least "nonfiction" in the sense of, say, Bukowski, rather than, say, Elie Wiesel or James Frey or the Running with Scissors guy or anyone else whose "memoirs" were made up...)
pjvj
Oct. 1st, 2008 05:12 pm (UTC)
It's not incest-- her father is her pimp.
================================

And as odd as it sounds, that squicks me less than if it were incest.

As to the non-fiction part, you've confused me.... all that you mentioned was fiction except Bukowski - or "fiction" based on actual occurrences? When books and movies come out as "based on a true story" that phrase is so loose it has no meaning at all. I never know what is true, what is fiction, which are composite characters, etc.
xterminal
Oct. 2nd, 2008 01:12 pm (UTC)
Bukowski wrote autobiographical novels that he never claimed were anything but fiction-- though, in fact, they weren't. All the others wrote semi-autobiographical novels they claimed were true, and were later discovered not to be.
pjvj
Oct. 2nd, 2008 01:20 pm (UTC)
Ohhh! That is truly fascinating to learn. Thank you!

I once - 100 years ago when I was 14 or 15 - started a novel (the title is "Through Stained-glass Eyes" and that is the best part of it) and that is the way I was writing it, autobiographical claimed as fiction.
( 17 comments — Leave a comment )